Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Saturday, August 12, 2017

Friday, August 11, 2017

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

Light, Geometric Planes, Attendant Emotions

Lyonel Feininger, Sunset at Deep (Sunset), 1930, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

"Whatever Happened to Bishop Pike?"

Dr Martin Luther King at Grace Cathedral with Bishop James Pike and Reverend George L Bedford

















Worth a few minutes.  Please click HERE.

Sunday, July 30, 2017

Peter Dizozza Live at the Sidewalk Cafe

In anticipation of the publication of Terrance Lindall's Milton in Outer Space,  Peter Dizozza and Terrance Lindall have composed a musical number. Please click HERE for a sample of Mr. Dizzoza premiering the piece on July 26 at the Sidewalk Cafe in New York.

Peter Dizozza


Saturday, July 29, 2017

Aapparatus for for purging carbon dioxide from Lunar Module, Apollo 13


















Interior view of the Apollo 13 Lunar Module (LM) showing the "mail box," a jury-rigged arrangement which the Apollo 13 astronauts built to use the Command Module (CM) lithium hydroxide canisters to purge carbon dioxide from the LM. Lithium hydroxide is used to scrub CO2 from the spacecraft's atmosphere. Since there was a limited amount of lithium hydroxide in the LM, this arrangement was rigged up to utilize the canisters from the CM. The "mail box" was designed and tested on the ground at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) before it was suggested to the problem-plagued Apollo 13 crew men. Because of the explosion of one of the oxygen tanks in the Service Module (SM), the three crew men had to use the LM as a "lifeboat".
Source 

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Andrew Darlington on Michael Butterworth

UK writer Andrew Darlington has fiction appearing in a number of Emanations anthologies, including the latest, Emanations: I Am Not a Number.

He maintains a blog and has recently posted a lengthy interview/essay/bibliography on Michael Butterworth, who is a member of the International Authors editorial board.  Please click HERE to view the piece.

Monday, July 24, 2017

Recommendation: Kristine Shmenco

Poet and fiction writer Kristine Shmenco has been associated with International authors for some time. In fact, she was part of International Authors before it became International Authors--which as a "community" traces back perhaps fifteen years (but more on that story later)...  Meanwhile, in addition to contributing to the Emanations anthology, she helped staff the International Authors table at the Brooklyn Book festival in 2013.  She also joined us in Manhattan for a meeting of International Authors in 2015

She posts a steady stream of intriguing short fiction to her blog, Indigo Vales.  Please click HERE to view her latest work.

Friday, July 21, 2017

Kabul















Female students at the Polytechnical University in Kabul, Afghanistan, mid-1970s.

Thursday, July 20, 2017

Edward Drinker Cope



















On December 29, 1906, a meeting was held in the American Museum of Natural History to present an installation of ten marble busts commemorating “Pioneers of American Science”. The personal character, the contributions and the significance of each scientist was the subject of an address given by a presenter, of which there were ten.  Here is the text of the address commemorating Edward Drinker Cope delivered by Dr. Henry Fairfield Osborn, Curator, Department of Vertebrate Palæontology:
In the marble portrait of Edward Drinker Cope, you see the man of large brain, of keen eye and of strong resolve, the ideal combination for a life of science, the man who scorns obstacles, who while battling with the present looks above and beyond. The portrait stands in its niche as a tribute to a great leader and founder of American Palæontology, as an inspiration to young Americans. In unison with the other portraits its forcible words are: “Go thou and do likewise.
Cope, a Philadelphian, born July 28, 1840, passed away at the early age of fifty-seven. Favored by heredity, through distinguished ancestry of Pennsylvania Quakers, who bequeathed intellectual keenness and a constructive spirit. As a boy of eight entering a life of travel and observation, and with rare precocity giving promise of the finest qualities of his manhood. Of incessant activity of mind and body, tireless as an explorer, early discovering for himself that the greatest pleasure and stimulus of life is to penetrate the unknown in Nature. In personal character fearless, independent, venturesome, militant, far less of a Quaker in disposition than his Teutonic fellow citizen Leidy. Of enormous productiveness, as an editor conducting the American Naturalist for nineteen years, as a writer leaving a shelf-full of twenty octavo and three great quarto volumes of original research.  A man of fortitude, bearing material reverses with good cheer, because he lived in the world of ideas and to the very last moment of his life drew constant refreshment from the mysterious regions of the unexplored.
In every one of the five great lines of research into which he ventured, he reached the mountain peaks where exploration and discovery guided by imagination and happy inspiration gave his work a leadership. His studies among fishes alone would give him a chief rank among zoölogists, on amphibians and reptiles there never has been a naturalist who has published so many papers, while from 1868 until 1897, the year of his death, he was a tireless student and explorer of the mammals. Among animals of all these classes his generalizations marked new epochs. While far from infallible, his ideas acted as fertilizers on the minds of other men. As a palæontologist, enjoying with Leidy and Marsh the Arcadian period when all the wonders of our great West were new, from his elevation of knowledge which enabled him to survey the whole field with keen eye he swooped down like an eagle upon the most important point.
In breadth, depth and range we see in Cope the very antithesis of the modern specialist, the last exponent of the race of the Buffon, Cuvier, Owen and Huxley type. Of ability, memory and courage sufficient to grasp the whole field of natural history, as comparative anatomist he ranks with Cuvier and Owen; as palæontologist with Owen, Marsh and Leidy—the other two founders of American palæontology; as natural philosopher less logical but more constructive than Huxley. America will produce men of as great, perhaps greater genius, but Cope represents a type which is now extinct and never will be seen again.
















Source:  The American Museum Journal, Vol. VII, No. 2, February, 1907, p. 25-26.

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

The Medium is the Message















Today many people are active on the internet and communicating globally. If our technology was still limited to shortwave communications, I doubt so many would feel the need to broadcast themselves around the world.  Perhaps the key factor here is the preference for written over verbal communications?  Compare the preference people have to "text" rather than speak over their telephones.

For a quick glance at the contemporary world of shortwave radio communications, please click HERE.